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Arts > Night and Day

Night and Day

 

Published 2/25/2009

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Night and Day ARCHIVES
More from Megan O'Neil

Night and Day (10/6/2010)

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Night and Day (9/22/2010)

FRIDAY-SUNDAY • 27-1
CIRQUE ELOIZE: NEBBIA
THE ART OF THE BIG TOP

Those masters of the pendulous, the performing-arts powerhouse of Cirque Eloize swings into Detroit for Nebbia (or fog), the final installment in their Sky Trilogy. Cirque Eloize began thrilling audiences in 1993 and has since brought their high-art circus to 30 different countries around the world. Nebbia's high-flying acrobatics and sensual theatrical elements,
coupled with a beautiful and well-matched score, blur the lines between art, dance, theater and circus. The excitement begins at the Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts, 350 Madison Ave., Detroit; 313-887-8501; musichall.org. Performances are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday.

FRIDAY • 27
WARREN MACKENZIE - POTS
PURPOSEFUL CERAMICS

Minnesota-based potter Warren MacKenzie has created elegantly simple hand-thrown pots for more than 60 years. His aesthetic draws inspiration from Asian folk pottery where functionality is at the heart of design. MacKenzie refers to his works as "everyday pots," a belief that led him to periodically stop signing his pieces and to sell them as inexpensively as possible, despite the high prices they command among collectors. A professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota, MacKenzie, at 85, is still an active potter, continually adding to his already prodigious body of work. Opening 6-8 p.m. at Susanne Hilberry Gallery, 700 Livernois, Ferndale; 248-541- 4700; on display through April 11.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY • 27-1
DIVINE STELLA DEVINE
THE BATTLE OF THE AGES

The Spotlight Players of the Village Theater of Cherry Hill serve up a healthy portion of comedic deceit in their rendition of Divine Stella Devine. The play tells the story of Stella, the leading lady of a popular theater group, and her No. 1 fan — who also just happens to be out to steal Stella's part. The aging diva must battle with her young saboteur while preparing for her next big role, resulting in some song-and-dancefilled shenanigans (the best kind, right?). At 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Village Theater of Cherry Hill, 50400 Cherry Hill Rd., Canton; 734-394-5300; spotlightplayers.net. $13 discount tickets available online, $15-$18 at the box office, runs through March 8.

SATURDAY • 28
UNITED STATES OF MIND ALBUM RELEASE PARTY
RETURN OF THE BULL

In 2007, United States of Mind ran a monthly hip-hop party known as Kill the Bullshit at Ozen Lounge. When the club changed hands, the night came to an end, but the hiatus gave USM a chance to record their debut album, Kill the Bullshit (what else?). The disc drops just in time to celebrate its release at the return of Kill the Bullshit, revamped, relocated and set to take place the last Saturday of every month. The shit will fly at 10 p.m. at Elements Gallery, 2125 Michigan Ave., Detroit; $5. With performances by Midcoast Most, Aztek the Barfly, Autopilots and DJs Crate Digga and Sleepy Biggs.

SATURDAY • 28
ALADDIN
BALLET AND MAGIC

Originally told in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, the 18th century tale of the precocious Aladdin and his magic lamp was a storybook, an opera and a stage play before it reached the pinnacle of American culture: a Disney animated film. Now the balletic production of the whimsical lad and the genie has dancers tour jeté-ing and relevé-ing an interpretation of the enduring story. Part coming of age, part fantasy, part cultural adventure, the Grand Rapids Ballet Company uses a full range of orchestral music, a flying carpet and a genie puppet to weave through the Middle Eastern landscape. Productions take place at noon and 5 p.m. at the Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-961-3500. $12-$47.

SATURDAY • 28
JACK LESSENBERRY ON "THE DECADE THAT SHAPED DETROIT'S DESTINY"
KAY-TEL FOR INTELLECTUALS

The joke about the '60s goes that if you claim to remember, you couldn't have really been there. So on those grounds, you may challenge whether it's worth listening to the collection of veterans — from reporters to rock promoters — being presented as part of "The Sixties: A Decade that Defined a Generation." Wayne State University journalism prof and MT columnist Jack Lessenberry considers how the decade still defines the nation in the kick-off event at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 28. Subsequent free events consider aspects of the Detroit '60s from music to downtown shopping to the Detroit rebellion. A special Thursday lecture series (admission $15) begins March 5 and features civil rights leader Andrew Young,
feminist activist Gloria Steinem, JFK adviser Ted Sorenson and Vietnam War historian Stanley Karnow. Ticketed performances include Richie Havens and the Smothers Brothers. Standing exhibitions features psychedelic posters, a timeline, photos and continuous videos. Lorenzo Cultural Center, 44575 Garfield Rd., Clinton Township; call 586-445-7348 or visit lorenzoculturalcenter.com. Through May 16.

SATURDAY • 28
EROTIC POETRY & MUSIC FESTIVAL
SENSUAL, SENSORY ASSAULT

A well-rounded tantalization of your nether-regions, the 22nd Annual Erotic Poetry & Music Festival claims to be one of the oldest community arts festivals in Detroit. The evening features poetry, art, music and dance performances, all provocatively packaged for your aural and visual pleasure. Performers include sassy burlesque troupe Spag Burlesque, Satori Circus, Stephanie Loveless, Jimmy Doom and more. Set your senses a-tingling at 9 p.m. at the Corktown Tavern, 1716 Michigan Ave, Corktown. 313-886- 7860. Tickets are $8 with a portion of the proceeds benefiting Paws with a Cause.

MONDAY • 2
THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES
HARDCORE GROWS UP

The Seattle quartet These Arms are Snakes are undergoing some sort of post-hardcore epiphany where teenage angst transforms into adult anxiety. The raging guitars and screaming vocals are all still there, but so are moments of melodic contemplation and danceable — yes, really danceable — beats. But while the foursome's third disc, Tail Swallower and Dove, finds them exploring more complex musical terrain than their hardcore brethren, never fear — the live show is still a mesmerizing spectacle of sweat, flailing limbs and unfettered aggression. Dude, didn't you know mosh pits are still cool? With Darker My Love, All the Saints and Sunlight Ascending at the Magic Stick, 4120 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7665; $8 advance, $10 day of show; all ages.

TUESDAY • 3
GINO ROBAIR AND FRIENDS
WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE…

There was a time when the jazz world was all about the moment. Titles like Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes & Brazil '66 or Sonny Meets Hawk! So this could have been billed as Gino Robair Meets the Motown Outcats or something like that. You can figure percussionist Robair's aesthetic from the folks he's recorded (and sometimes recorded with) on his Rastascan label: Anthony Braxton, Eugene Chadbourne and Derek Bailey to name a few. (The Sun Ra tribute disc he organized, Wavelength Infinity, is of particular note.) The friends he'll "meet" up with here are Mike Khoury, Joel Peterson, James Cornish and Piotr Michalowski. Expect open-ended fireworks and moments of nervous reflection. Kerrytown Concert House, 415 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor; 734-769-2999.

ONGOING
YOUR CITY NEXT; WHY I LOVE DETROIT
OWN A PIECE OF THE D

Even though it's at an all-time economic low, you probably still couldn't afford to buy the city of Detroit (and be honest now, would you really even want to?). But, thanks to photo/video journalist Stephen McGee, you can own a piece of it. McGee has traveled the world covering environmental and humanitarian stories, and his award-winning work has graced the pages of The New York Times, Washington Post, People and the Free Press. Currently a Detroit resident, McGee has spent two years capturing optimistic images of urban landscapes and portraits set within the confines of his adopted home. The photos will be on display through March 28 at the Bureau of Urban Living, 460 W. Canfield St., Detroit; 313- 833-9336.

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