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Stories written by Kelli B. Kavanaugh

20 stories found. Showing page 1 of 1.

In a word

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 12/31/2008

Types: Arts, Visual arts

For its inaugural Eminent Artist Award, Kresge Arts in Detroit chose Charles McGee. The selection shouldn't be met with much criticism — after all, McGee is a much-loved, well-regarded local artist whose prodigious output has left a deep imprint on his adopted hometown. Born in South Car...[MORE]

Cash flow: The Kresge Foundation fends off artist starvation and fuels the creative class

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 12/31/2008

Types: Arts, Visual arts

In a city where buying groceries is often a struggle and the general populace cares more about the Lions than Lascaux, a skilled artist with some ambition can't be faulted for dreaming of greener pastures. Who could blame them? And while many artists over the years have found their muse in Det...[MORE]

Game not over: Demolition begins, but efforts to save parts of Tiger Stadium continue

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 7/9/2008

Types: Culture, Sports

It's hard to believe that it's been almost 10 years since the last game was played at Tiger Stadium. It's even harder to believe that its fate is not yet set in stone. While selective dismantling has begun on the building's northeast corner, the Old Tiger Stadium Conservancy (OTSC) is still wor...[MORE]

Winter's here — surf's up!: But watch out when your buddy's lips turn blue

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 1/23/2008

Types: Culture, Sports

Surfing, that sexy sport of washboard abs and bleach-blond hair, sunny blue skies and palm trees, has gotten the proverbial makeunder.     Picture instead a head-to-toe Neoprene wetsuit and cloudy gray skies, and you've got the picture of Great Lakes surfing. Michigan, ...[MORE]

Wandering wine country: Detroiters who’ve got no gripes about Canadian grapes

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 10/3/2007

Types: Culture, Travel

We were a motley crew, four cyclists on back roads in Ontario farm country. Two of us were experienced riders, the other two on borrowed bikes. Did I mention we were tipsy? Ontario farm country is perfect for grapes. Apparently, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario provide a microclimate that keeps summe...[MORE]

Roots of war: Giving hell that homey feeling

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 4/11/2007

Types: Culture, House & garden

For most middle-class Americans, including myself, gardening is a relaxing hobby, not a necessity. There's nothing like cultivating a head of cabbage or a bucket full of ripe tomatoes from delicate seedlings in my back yard. The pastime calms me and keeps me sane. But it's certainly not the one ...[MORE]

Building community: Architects get their say in a lecture series

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 1/31/2007

Types: Arts, Architecture

Artists have gallery openings, poets have in-store readings and musicians have concerts. Be it in the back of a bar or inside an arena with stadium seating, most creative people have some way of interacting with their audience. But architects, who are working in arguably the most people-oriented...[MORE]

Hardcover hero: Saving the world with a sleek book

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 12/6/2006

Types: Arts, Literature, Books

To change the world is an audacious goal, but a small group of environmentally minded journalists in Seattle have bravely claimed that very objective as their own. Their Web site, WorldChanging.com, was started three years ago, motivated by writers just plain tired of reporting global gloom and ...[MORE]

Armchair traveling: Stay at home and see the world

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 11/22/2006

Types: Arts

Thailand's overrun with Brits and Costa Rica with eco-travelers. As travel becomes accessible to more and more people, the road less traveled can begin to look like a highway. As a result, book series, such as Lonely Planet, tout unusual experiences loosely grouped under the heading of anti-tour...[MORE]

Ringing true: The sound of music enlivens an old church

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 8/16/2006

Types: Arts, Architecture

St. Albertus Fest isn't your usual music festival. How often do you head to church to drink a few High Lifes, grub on some golabki and listen to hip hop, punk and bluegrass? The event manages to mix the old with the new, supporting and celebrating religion, ethnic pluralism and youthful exuberan...[MORE]

They tried to warn us: In 1951, UAW Local 600 saw into our troubled future.

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 5/21/2003

Types: News, Business

Unions are a ubiquitous component of metropolitan Detroit’s fabric. And while Detroit is indisputably a union town, unions, for the most part, have become such a part of the status quo that it may be hard to fathom today the depths of radicalism into which unionism once plunged its advocates. I...[MORE]

Mystery man: At the root of the Nation of Islam, a cipher and a controversy.

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 3/5/2003

Types: Culture

Did Shakespeare actually author the work attributed to his name? Did Marco Polo ever reach China? Did Lee Harvey Oswald act alone? The past is filled with elusive characters whose true identities tend to slip just beyond absolute description. That’s not to say that anyone so amorphous is not ca...[MORE]

Take me to the river: Summer on the Bob-Lo boat — when the livin’ was easy.

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 1/15/2003

Types: Culture

In Ecorse, where smokestacks rise above your head and the Detroit River runs just past your outstretched fingers, there floats an unusual sight. It appears suddenly, at the foot of a street named after a steel plant, as if a ghost barge has arisen from the murky depths of an industrial canal. B...[MORE]

Island winters: Learning to love the cold and the beauty was easier a century ago.

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 12/11/2002

Types: Culture

Maybe it’s simplistic, but it seems that people can generally be divided into two categories: introverted or extroverted, romantic or pragmatic, Type A or Type B. Furthermore, in the Midwest, most of us can be characterized in two ways when it comes to our winter adaptability: as a hibernator or a...[MORE]

Sanctuary: A frigid Midnight Mass amid the ghosts of faith, defiance and bloody Christmases past.

By Kelli B. Kavanaugh

Published: 11/20/2002

Types: Culture, Spirituality

Yuletide, more than any other time of year, draws lapsed Catholics back to the flock. The motivations behind these furtive church visits vary: tradition, guilt, obligation, celebration. Last Christmas Eve, I joined the parade of prodigal sons and daughters darkening the doors of churches. My mo...[MORE]

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