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Stories written by Timothy Dugdale

78 stories found. Showing page 1 of 3.

Belgian bully: Slavery in the turn-of-the-century Congo.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 3/8/2000

Types: Arts, Literature

King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa by Adam Hochschild Houghton Mifflin Company, $15, 367 pp. The year is 1898. You are a young shipping clerk for a Liverpool-based firm that has the e...[MORE]

Fear of flying: Shaking down the friendly skies of Hollywood action.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 2/23/2000

Types: Screens, Film

Dec. 31, 1999 was a heavy news day, to say the least. Boris Yeltsin resigned. Telegenic millennium celebrations were either under way or about to get under way around the globe. And terrorists released the 155 passengers they had been holding for more th...[MORE]

Getting gamy: In which the Donald plays his trump and expounds on living large.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 1/5/2000

Types: Screens, Television

"Sock it to me." Anyone who knew that Richard Nixon was the president who made a guest cameo on "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In" couldn't help but hope that million-dollar winner John Carpenter would have mimicked Tricky Dick a...[MORE]

Limeys in America: Dancing to a different clampdown in the New World.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 12/1/1999

Types: Screens, Film

There are many fine moments in Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven (1992). One in particular stands out. Sheriff Little Bill Daggett (Gene Hackman) is relaxing after a busy Fourth of July. Sitting in his jail is English Bob (Richard Harris), an aging snob and e...[MORE]

The chill of the game: One man's search for cool leads to insights about pro basketball.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 11/24/1999

Types: Culture, Sports

Contrary to what Nike would like us to believe, far more people watch rather than actually play sports. So what exactly are we armchair superstars watching? David Shields has a pretty good idea, at least when it comes to basketball. In his new b...[MORE]

Hip-hop cash crop

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 10/20/1999

Types: Screens

Ordinarily I’m pretty much immune to the dubious charms of advertising. I have a remote control and know how to use it. But ever so often, you hit upon an ad so dreadful that, as much as you want to look away, you can’t. Just like when "Ba...[MORE]

Tele-vitalizers

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 10/13/1999

Types: Screens

After decades of hand-wringing by parents’ groups and reams of studies by sociologists, the medical community has at last weighed in on television and the young. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that not only does media violence do harm ...[MORE]

Hollywood Gomorrah

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 9/22/1999

Types: Screens, Film

Last weekend I witnessed a miracle. Croatian pianist Ivo Pogorelich, ever the iconoclast, gave a super-lugubrious, super-emotive performance of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2. Reaction was predictably mixed: Half the audience sat on thei...[MORE]

Back to basics

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 8/11/1999

Types: Screens

The first time I saw Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless, I was 15. It was a revelation of the highest order. Everything about it was stunning – the handheld camera work in the sexy streets of Gay Paree, the jazzy score, the insouciant mischief-making of Je...[MORE]

Empire of fun

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 7/7/1999

Types: Screens

ABC led off its Saturday newscast during the Memorial Day weekend with a telling item. After praising how much Americans like the romance of getting away, the segment switched tone and offered a downbeat survey of how clogged the highways were and how long the lines were at...[MORE]

Light from the tube

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 6/2/1999

Types: Screens

"If one could believe in God, would he fill the desert?" – Graham Greene, The End of the Affair The spirit of television moves in mysterious ways. Perhaps it’s just me, but it didn’t seem the least bit fishy that Billy Graham would m...[MORE]

Celebrity washouts

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 5/12/1999

Types: Screens, Film

In the wake of the school shooting in Colorado, it seems every showbiz personality in America is being brought before the cameras to testify about violence and the mass media. Here we go again, you say. Still, interesting things are being said by some surprising sources. ...[MORE]

Solo warriors: The relevance of the samurai film to our age should be abundantly clear.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 10/14/1998

Types: Screens, Video

For the better part of the decade, we have been besieged by a constant revamping, retooling and retrofitting of the film noir genre for shock value. What almost all of these films had in common was their social irrelevance. This is not surprising as: a) the intended audience was as oblivious to ...[MORE]

Little Hitlers: How can one ride out a tidal wave of memory with a suftboard of guilt?

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 10/28/1998

Types: Screens, Video

These must be sleepless nights for Augusto Pinochet. All the old desperadoes are gone -- Mobutu, Papa Doc, Bokassa, Stroessner, Somoza. Only the wily Chilean with the stoic sag in his cheeks and virtuous gleam in his eyes was going to beat the clock and have a nice smooth ride into oblivion, all...[MORE]

Once upon a tragedy: A collective reluctance to face the unhappy music that other people's facts play for us.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 11/4/1998

Types: Screens, Video

When your scribe comes across an interesting ditty in the popular press, he's always keen for a peek. Such was the case with Christopher Hitchens' diatribe about the irrelevance of history to Americans that appears in this month's Harper's. The same month brought us the most hyped post-Cold War ...[MORE]

Delusions in b & w: We crave the golden age of the suburbs

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 11/11/1998

Types: Screens

Few things are more pleasing than watching Newt Gingrich eat crow. Alas, Washington will soon bid him goodbye and he'll be chowing down in the privacy of his bunker deep in the smug, antiseptic bosom of suburban Atlanta, from whence he came. Newt's tumble into the pit of hubris coincides wit...[MORE]

East as beast: Fear loves nothing more than a scapegoat to roast on its spit.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 11/18/1998

Types: Screens

More than a few of you will be reading these words from the comfort of a booth at La Shish or Byblos. Nothing better than a shish tawook and lentil soup to take the edge off my heavy trip. The sabers of the Middle East are rattling, and not just in front of the shawarma rack. At any moment, t...[MORE]

Eating in the dark: When you put singing and flesh eating together, how can you go wrong?

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 11/25/1998

Types: Screens

If aliens were to arrive on Earth tomorrow, no doubt in short time they'd make their way to a shopping mall. And what would they learn there? Lesson No. 1: Americans love to eat. And as we are fast approaching the Season of the Binge, soon you'll find millions of people waddling a swath through ...[MORE]

Goodbye to all: In some film genres, death is supposed to come easy.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 12/9/1998

Types: Screens

Say what you will about Jack Kevorkian, but the cadaverous old bird's got moxie. No less than "60 Minutes" -- admittedly during sweeps month-- gave Black Jack a solid quarter hour to showcase his singular talent for inducing the Big Sleep. Rendered in that washed-out camcorder look we associate ...[MORE]

Restaurant Ringmasters: A good maitre d' balances diners and dinners, all in the name of civility.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 12/16/1998

Types: Food & Drink

It's a Friday night in the foyer of a tony restaurant somewhere in our fair metropolis. Last seating has come and gone, the kitchen can relax. Or perhaps not. A man dressed in Hawaiian shirt, jeans and scruffy loafers has appeared 15 minute...[MORE]

Great recipes revisited: Not a remake, not an homage, but a slavish restaging.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 12/16/1998

Types: Screens

Many film critics are wondering out loud why in God's name Gus Van Sant was allowed to spend $25 million to "restage" Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). Implicit in this indignation is a knee-jerk allegiance to the sanctity of so-called masterpieces. Yet when one thinks of the legion of d...[MORE]

Living room combat: A smart bomb attack is under way, in all its video-game glory.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 12/23/1998

Types: Screens

Your scribe fully intended to compose a scintillating exposé on the impeachment vote. Alas, it was not to be. Instead, we have Operation Desert Fox to appraise, not as a political or military exercise , mind you, but as a media event. What is initially striking abo...[MORE]

Drive, we said: Races, chases, backseats and hitchhikers.

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 1/6/1999

Types: Culture, Travel

"Man, I wish you could've seen it," the cabbie beamed as we barreled down out of Pacific Heights. "These two chicks hijacked a friend of mine's taxi. I was listening to the police radio and ran them down. It was like right outta Bullitt (1968). Shit, I love that film." No...[MORE]

Guerrilla video

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 4/14/1999

Types: Screens

The sharpest critic of any prophecy is time. And "the revolution will not be televised" is shaping up as a keeper. Despite its many telegenic flashpoints of violence and mayhem, history is an evolutionary, not revolutionary, force. For every dream of a new tomorro...[MORE]

Finding the Force

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 4/7/1999

Types: Screens

I am not looking forward to this summer. Not one bit. We’ll see the release of the long awaited – but not by me – Star Wars prequel. The nerds will take over the multiplexes and those of us in search of air conditioning will have to contend with hordes of for...[MORE]

Eternal Pat

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 3/31/1999

Types: Screens

Pat Buchanan The Beltway Washington, D.C. Dear Pat, I heard all your staff left to work for that dreadful moneybags, Steve Forbes. Tough luck, killer. Please find enclosed a check for $10. I know it’s not much, but it’s the thought that counts....[MORE]

You be illin'

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 3/24/1999

Types: Screens

Why is it that when I’m trying to watch the evening news, I always feel as if I’m doing it from the comfort of a hospital gurney? After reports on Mrs. Clinton’s visit to New York, the breakdown of peace talks in Kosovo and the daily bombing of Saddam’s ...[MORE]

TV dinners

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 3/10/1999

Types: Screens, Video

America loves to eat. Just go to any mall food court and you’ll see troughing like nowhere else on earth. And what, pray tell, are the hungry and harried jamming down their gullets? Comfort food, the very stuff that makes the surgeon general and the American Medical As...[MORE]

Furious George

By Timothy Dugdale

Published: 3/3/1999

Types: Screens

They say good news travels fast. But the bad can be equally fleet. And it is bad news indeed when Andrew "Dice" Clay is coming to town, I assume, to deliver nursery rhythms and sundry misogynistic rubbish for which he was granted 15 minutes of fame and a few milli...[MORE]

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