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Health Stories

144 stories found. Showing page 1 of 5.

Pot, pols and polls: State AG race an important one for medical marijuana

By Larry Gabriel

Published: 10/6/2010

Types: Culture, Health & science

Just because the Detroit Election Commission chose not to put the question of legalizing marijuana on the Nov. 2 ballot doesn't mean there's no cannabis drama in this election. At least for Michigan medical marijuana activists, the contest for attorney general is crucial. "We're concerned abou...[MORE]

Bubbling up: A success story, Michigan-made beer pours it on

By Michael Jackman

Published: 7/15/2009

Types: Culture, Health & science

When it comes to craft brewing, Michigan is sort of a paradox. Across the country, the state has a growing reputation for brewing award-winning beer, and U.S. drinkers are raising their glasses to the state's quality small brewers, including Kalamazoo's prized Bell's Beer. But Michigan drinkers have...[MORE]

Highlighting ACCESS

By News Hits staff

Published: 11/12/2008

Types: Culture, Health & science

Last week marked the fifth time that the local group ACCESS hosted a national conference highlighting health issues in the Arab-American community.Judging from the attendance and the breadth of topics at the Dearborn Inn, we'd say the event also highlighted the extent to which ACCESS has gained ...[MORE]

Profiles in forage: When food gets political, some become conscientious eaters

By Michael Jackman

Published: 4/9/2008

Types: Culture, Health & science

Who would have dreamed 10 years ago that food would be as political as it is today? Between genetically modified plants, rising oil costs driving prices skyward, and the glut of processed "foods," our food sources seem more insecure than ever. For most concerned families, it's a challenge to fig...[MORE]

Oasis-building: Fighting for freshness in a 'food desert'

By Samantha Cleaver

Published: 4/9/2008

Types: Culture, Health & science

Shopping in early spring, the only local foods that Patrick Crouch, field and greenhouse coordinator for Earth Works, can find at Eastern Market are rhubarb, local eggs, some meat and remnants of last year's harvest that people have held over the winter — cabbage, potatoes, apples. Spring...[MORE]

Healthcare-dot-dollars: Online medical sites raise ethical questions.

By Tamara Straus

Published: 12/22/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

With experts predicting that some 30 million Americans will go online for health information by the year's end, it is not particularly surprising that nationally recognized doctors have teamed up with Internet entrepreneurs to get a piece of the ...[MORE]

Rethinking ink: First the trend was to get a tattoo. Now, it's to get rid of them.

By Curtrise Garner

Published: 12/15/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

When Jay Wheeler had two dragons and "a big crazy tree with a bunch of faces" inked on his arm, it was the cool thing to do. That was seven years ago, when he was 19. Now he looks at his arm and wants to cover it up. "That'...[MORE]

Decisions, decisions: Forget HMOs. Computers are rationing health care.

By Edward Ericson Jr.

Published: 11/10/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

In a building in Westwood, Mass., sits a room with a computer on which more than 20 million files wait, growing in number and complexity every day, each one starting with a name. They are medical files, and they include information about a person’s...[MORE]

(De)Mythologizing Bats: Some facts about bats

By Samantha Cleaver

Published: 10/31/2007

Types: Culture, Health & science

There are more than 1,100 bat species on Earth; one of every five mammal species is a bat. A bat can eat more than 1,000 mosquitoes a night, with moths and beetles for dessert. Next time you drink a margarita, thank the bats — they pollinate the agave plant that is made into tequila. Bats d...[MORE]

Cells of urban sweetness: Exhausted from overwork on commercial farms, thanks to a few folks, bees are on the job in Detroit

By Cyan James

Published: 9/12/2007

Types: Culture, Health & science

A gauzy cloud of softly buzzing bees enfolds me as I stand in an abandoned lot in downtown Detroit. A tall man in a white suit like an astronaut's saunters through the tall weeds, carrying a device similar to a silver teapot with grass protruding from its spout. The "teapot" emits a trickle of ...[MORE]

Java jab: The dark history of the drug that drives America.

By Alisa Gordaneer

Published: 10/6/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

UNCOMMON GROUNDS: THE HISTORY OF COFFEE AND HOW IT TRANSFORMED OUR WORLD By Mark Pendegrast Basic Books, $27.50, 520pp. With cream? Sugar? Both or neither? Do you prefer your brew scalding hot, gulped down straight ...[MORE]

Alternative health: A look at complementary therapies out there.

By Metro Times staff

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

In this special MT issue, our writers look at some of the complementary alternative therapies out there. We’ll guide you through finding the practices that might work for you, and show you how some have worked for others. We don’t have all the answer...[MORE]

Not so alternative anymore: Complementary medicine moves into the mainstream.

By Jennifer Bagwell

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

Sharon Crump picks up a bottle marked "E 400" from the drugstore shelf. "I just polished off a bottle of these," she tells Carol Hitchcock of Southfield, who is clutching a bottle marked "Mega-Energy," a concoction of more t...[MORE]

Needle-point balance: Acupuncture crosses boundaries between East and West.

By Elissa Karg

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

When Kevin Elliott Thompson practices acupuncture, he begins by looking at his client’s tongue. "If the tongue is moist or dry, if it’s bright or dull, pink or red, it tells me about dampness and heat, deficiency and excess," ...[MORE]

The natural path: For skeptics, the hands-on approach helps in finding alternative therapies that work.

By Audrey Becker

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

When it comes to alternative medicine, a healthy dose of skepticism may be just what the shaman ordered. Now, I’m not certain whether I’m a card-carrying skeptic. Like many, I’ve stumbled my way through the maze of herbal remedies....[MORE]

The many alternatives: A quick guide to some of the various therapies out there.

By Alisa Gordaneer

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

Here is a selection of alternative and complementary therapies that have risen to some degree of popularity in this country. As with all systems of medicine, whether they are useful or not is up to you to decide. Acupuncture: Chinese and Japanese...[MORE]

Learning to let go: Healing Touch helps patients remember to relax.

By Jane Slaughter

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

When Healing Touch practitioner Suzanne Skowronski got through with me, I felt just as nurtured, relaxed and energized as I’ve ever felt after a professional massage. Yet Skowronski, who practices at the Thea Bowman Nurse-Managed Center in H...[MORE]

Hemp for health: Hemp seed oil may not be a miracle cure, but it sure is good for you.

By Gretchen Van Monette

Published: 6/30/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

Over the centuries, hemp seeds and their oil have been recognized by various cultures as an effective herbal treatment for a variety of ailments, from constipation to PMS. Today, research shows that hemp seed oil can have therapeutic benefits, inc...[MORE]

Now’s the time

By Larry Gabriel

Published: 8/15/2007

Types: Culture, Health & science

Real opportunities to nationalize health insurance in the United States only come around once in a while. The last time was in 1993, when a plan by then-first lady Hillary Clinton was trashed by corporate opposition. Now is the best chance since then. Most Americans agree that the system doesn'...[MORE]

Summer beauty secrets revealed!: Look years younger - one woman tells how!

By Liz Langley

Published: 5/5/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

"The strawberry grows beneath the nettle," Shakespeare said, an acknowledgment that the bitter and the sweet are often blended in an inseparable package. This blending happened to me at an adult video store where I, the strawberry, was carded bef...[MORE]

Radical prescription: A Birmingham doctor breaks ranks to treat chronic fatigue syndrome as a real disease.

By Jackie Headapohl

Published: 4/28/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

In years past, doctors scoffed at washing their hands before surgery, prescribed vaginal douches for birth control, and made stomach ulcers synonymous with stress. Today, minor cuts get a scrubbing, contraception is a science, and antibiotics are used to...[MORE]

Patient, heal thyself: "I keep thinking I'll see the nurse who took care of me for a year. She saved my life."

By Desiree Cooper

Published: 10/14/1998

Types: Culture, Health & science

One hundred years ago, nurse Alice Bowen had a great idea: If you go into Detroit's neighborhoods preaching the gospel of good health, more people would escape the stress, pain and humiliation of debilitating disease. It was 1898 ...[MORE]

Labor movement: Midwives help give birth to new attitudes in women's health care.

By Amy Mitchell

Published: 10/28/1998

Types: Culture, Health & science

Not many women feel like Dearborn resident Colette Simkins felt immediately after giving birth. "I wanted to party," exults the 37-year-old mother of seven. "I felt fabulous." The arrival of seventh child Ellen ...[MORE]

Taste the new: Trends may come and trends may go, but we'll keep eating them up.

By Alisa Gordaneer

Published: 11/25/1998

Types: Culture, Health & science

Food is like clothing -- some items are trendy from one season to the next, some items are classics that will never really change. While some foods, such as red meat and 16-ounce steaks, fall out of fashion, others, such as fondue, come back like bell...[MORE]

Cold turkey at clinics

By Curt Guyette

Published: 12/16/1998

Types: Culture, Health & science

The survival of substance abuse clinics providing treatments to addicts in Detroit and Wayne County is in jeopardy because they haven't received Medicaid reimbursements since October 1 and don't know when payments will be made. At least nine clinics serving an estimated 4,500 addicts are bein...[MORE]

No ifs, ands or butts: Kids get savvy to tobacco marketing schemes.

By Jane Slaughter

Published: 4/14/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

The tobacco industry’s ongoing targeting of teens got its biggest boost in years from the movie Titanic. Sure, it was historically accurate to show Leonardo’s character puffing away, and Kate Winslet using cigarettes to defy her mother. The mes...[MORE]

It's a microbe's life: No matter how much we sanitize, purify and cleanse, the truth remains: Fungus is among us.

By Debra Oliver

Published: 4/7/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

Something’s changed in America, some definite shift in the air. I first noticed it recently when, barely off the plane from Paris at LAX, a friend took me aside and gave me a tiny bottle of Purell Instant Hand Sanitizer. "Best thing si...[MORE]

Pills, shills and thrills: We'll swallow anything, from elixers to ads

By Alisa Gordaneer

Published: 2/10/1999

Types: Culture, Health & science

Back in the early 19th century, people were more gullible than they are now. ("It was just because they didn’t have TV to tell them about the world," says the Lizard of Fun). Maybe, maybe not. Either way, they were inclined to beli...[MORE]

Hard bodies and hard questions : After death, show-and-tell goes on

By Rebecca Mazzei

Published: 1/17/2007

Types: Culture, Health & science

"You don't faint easily, do you?" Actually, yes, I do. I've blacked out before breakfast on more than one occasion. But no need to make the doctor nervous. On the way to the plastination laboratory, the one place that could be considered creepier than a morgue, where I'll soak in the sight of f...[MORE]

Bringing back the Dark Ages

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 9/27/2006

Types: Culture, Health & science

Last week, Dick DeVos, the man who is spending millions of dollars a month attempting to sucker you into voting for him for governor, escaped. Escaped his handlers, that is, who want to filter every word their man says through three speechwriters and two public relations consultants. But Amway ...[MORE]

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