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61 stories found. Showing page 1 of 3.

Greening our minds : How nature nurtures the brain

By Larry Gabriel

Published: 4/7/2010

Types: News, Science & technology

Last week's sunshine and warmth had me out raking and picking up the yard in anticipation of getting my garden growing. I even started some seeds germinating indoors and wondered if it was too early to put lettuce seeds in the ground. Lettuce does well in cooler weather and is one of the first thing...[MORE]

Up from the ashes: Consultants' idea: Turn Detroit into a "green city"

By News Hits staff

Published: 12/23/2009

Types: News, Science & technology

In a piece recently posted on the Harvard Business Review's website, Mark W. Johnson and Josh Suskewicz, of a Massachusetts consulting firm named Innosight, pointed out that the greenest city on the planet is currently being constructed in an area surrounded by the world's largest supply of oil: Mas...[MORE]

Obama's moment: What they offer, what's at stake

By Metro Times editorial staff

Published: 10/22/2008

Types: News, Science & technology

It should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with Metro Times that we would endorse Democratic Illinois Sen. Barack Obama for president over Sen. John McCain of Arizona. However, if you are tempted to view our support of Obama as knee-jerk progressive dogma, consider this: At least 25 news...[MORE]

Unsafe sex

By News Hits staff

Published: 6/11/2008

Types: News, Science & technology

When Eve Mokotoff, HIV epidemiology manager with the Michigan Department of Community Health, discusses the results of the latest annual review of HIV trends in Michigan, she labels them "stunning."And by stunning, she doesn't mean a thing of beauty. It's more like the shock or a hammer blow t...[MORE]

Losing patients: Program to fight cancer among poor is among casualties of hospital closing.

By Ann Mullen

Published: 3/8/2000

Types: News, Science & technology

After learning that the nation’s poor had the highest incidence of cancer and the lowest survival rate, Dr. Clarence Vaughn went to work in one of Detroit’s most impoverished neighborhoods. "I decided I needed to work in the city,&...[MORE]

The threat to the net: Big business wants to control the gate to your computer.

By Pat Aufderheide

Published: 2/2/2000

Types: News, Science & technology

Who owns the Internet? If you think the answer is "nobody," you’re right – for now.That’s why it has been such an astonishing innovation that has flourished so vibrantly at the grass roots. But this pioneering ...[MORE]

Healthcare-dot-dollars: Online medical sites raise ethical questions.

By Tamara Straus

Published: 12/22/1999

Types: News, Science & technology

With experts predicting that some 30 million Americans will go online for health information by the year's end, it is not particularly surprising that nationally recognized doctors have teamed up with Internet entrepreneurs to get a piece of the ...[MORE]

Low-power radio push

By Karen Mouradjian

Published: 9/15/1999

Types: News, Science & technology

With the Federal Communications Commission cutting off public comment this week on a proposal to legalize low-power FM stations, this is certain: The views of Michigan residents will be well-represented when a decision on the matter is finally made. ...[MORE]

Crash test kids: By now everyone should know that air bags can kill children. Why did kids have to die for the public to get the message?

By Curt Guyette

Published: 6/16/1999

Types: News, Science & technology

For Alison Sanders, the calculus of automobile safety and the vagaries of chance collided as dusk approached on a Sunday in October of 1995. Just a half-mile from her father’s home in suburban Baltimore, the 7-year-old sat on the front passenger ...[MORE]

Unwired Detroit?: Union claims Ameritech provides better phone service to the suburbs.

By Ann Mullen

Published: 11/18/1998

Types: News, Science & technology

Ameritech Corporation is focusing work on suburban communities while neglecting Detroit, according to the president of the Communications Workers of America local that covers Detroit and several suburbs. The claim is based on internal ...[MORE]

They say you'll pay: Net expert predicts the future of the Internet.

By Sandy Jaszczak

Published: 11/18/1998

Types: News, Science & technology

You've finally decided to buy that new PC for your home. Prices are low, modem speeds are up and life is looking pretty OK. Breathe deep, read on. Whether you think the Internet is a vast wasteland or the mother lode of ...[MORE]

Welcome to the Silicon Speedway: The smooth functioning of the Internet hinges on the computers of one Dearborn company.

By Sandy Jaszczak

Published: 11/18/1998

Types: News, Science & technology

With all the attention given to the Silicon alleys, valleys and prairies, the Detroit area may finally make it on the map as the Silicon Speedway, partly thanks to some diligent visionaries sitting at high-powered computers in a converted doctor's off...[MORE]

Digital diagnosis: Medical "smart cards" make access to your health records easy, but the information could fall into the wrong hands.

By John Smock

Published: 2/24/1999

Types: News, Science & technology

Earlier this year about 8,000 southeast Michigan residents received letters from their physicians informing them that they will soon be issued a Medcard. About the size of an ATM card, Medcards carry health care information ranging from benefits coverage...[MORE]

Alcoholiday!: A food column gets a liquid launch

By Curt Guyette

Published: 7/11/2007

Types: News, Science & technology

I call artist Jerome Ferretti and tell him we're starting this new column. The idea, I explain, is for a Metro Times writer to take someone interesting out to lunch and write about the experience. "I thought you'd be just the guy to get things off to a good start," I tell him. Then I suggest ...[MORE]

Lost in the supermarket: Forget everything you’ve heard about food in the last 30 years -- including what it is

By Michael Jackman

Published: 4/11/2007

Types: News, Science & technology

Food ain't what it used to be. At least not in the last 50 years. And we'd better face up to it. In the West, the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and genetic engineering (with generous government subsidies) has produced more food more cheaply than at any time in the history of the world...[MORE]

Hard bodies and hard questions : After death, show-and-tell goes on

By Rebecca Mazzei

Published: 1/17/2007

Types: News, Science & technology

"You don't faint easily, do you?" Actually, yes, I do. I've blacked out before breakfast on more than one occasion. But no need to make the doctor nervous. On the way to the plastination laboratory, the one place that could be considered creepier than a morgue, where I'll soak in the sight of f...[MORE]

Detroit’s chlamydia problem : Officials say the nation’s highest rate means attention for disease

By Sandra Svoboda

Published: 11/22/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

At the Detroit Department of Health and Wellness's sexually transmitted disease clinic, Dr. Jambunathan Ramanathan and his staff know they have to work a little differently with the teenagers who have chlamydia. Teens are more likely to have chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted dis...[MORE]

Of lice and libel: Ann Arbor enviro group sued by drugmaker

By Curt Guyette

Published: 8/23/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

You might say it's a real head-scratcher: Why would the United States ban the use of a highly toxic pesticide on crops and animals yet allow the same substance to be rubbed into the scalps of children? It's a question that has no good answer, say the folks at Ann Arbor's Ecology Center and othe...[MORE]

Pulp friction: The story of a father, his son and the doctored orange juice Detroiters were drinking 20 years ago.

By Curt Guyette

Published: 8/2/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

The allegations were bizarre. The person making them, a Detroit-area man in his mid-30s, contacted Metro Times to say he had both a story to tell and a haunting question he hoped could be answered. He claimed that more than two decades ago, starting in the early 1980s when he was about 12 year...[MORE]

Recycled

By News Hits staff

Published: 7/26/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

For those of you interested in the subject of ethanol, our cover story on the issue last week ("Stalking the answers," July 19) generated some spirited debate on the Enviro-Mich listserve. The online forum sponsored by the group Citizen Action (you can view the archives on the Web at great-lak...[MORE]

Tube food: The future for meat eaters could be way off the hoof

By Traci Hukill

Published: 7/19/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

As I type these words, men and women of science are growing meat in a laboratory. That's meat grown independently of any animal. It isn't hatched or born. It doesn't graze, walk or breathe. But it is alive. It sits growing in a room where somebody has called it into existence with a pipette and ...[MORE]

Stalking the answers: Critics and boosters tackle the questions about ethanol

By Ben Lefebvre

Published: 7/19/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

Bruce Dale got his education early. As a 12-year-old living in the mining town of Ruth, Nev., he saw his dad leave every morning to work at the nearby copper mines. Normally his father would come home and talk to his son about fishing, hunting or Bruce's schoolwork. But one evening it was diffe...[MORE]

Short-circuited?: Filmmaker charges GM pulled the plug on the EV1

By Jeff Meyers

Published: 7/5/2006

Types: News, Science & technology

It’s easy to see how the conspiracy theories got started. The commander in chief is an oilman. His vice president is an oilman. His former chief of staff was a former VP of General Motors. His secretary of state was on the board of Chevron. Is it really a surprise that oil industry profits...[MORE]

The deity’s advocate: A Christian law center in Ann Arbor has taken the lead in a crusade that pits "intelligent design" against evolution

By Gordy Slack

Published: 11/2/2005

Types: News, Science & technology

Richard Thompson — the former Oakland County prosecutor who gained notoriety through his repeated efforts to put Jack Kevorkian behind bars — has taken up a new crusade. As head of the Thomas More Law Center, a conservative Christian advocacy group based in Ann Arbor, Thompson is in a Pe...[MORE]

Stem cells and supreme folly

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 10/12/2005

Types: News, Science & technology

Imagine for a moment that it’s 1905, and right-wing religious types are in control of the Michigan Legislature. Some of them, led by the Amish, have grave religious doubts about the morality of the newfangled horseless carriages. So they pass a law severely restricting research into these ...[MORE]

Waste not … : … but who would want it?

By Sarah Klein

Published: 10/12/2005

Types: News, Science & technology

Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, kids had the following government-produced catchphrase repeatedly beaten into the pink pulpy flesh of their impressionable young minds: “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.” I remember being forced to draw the recycling pattern with my crayons in third gra...[MORE]

Patently frightening

By Keith A. Owens

Published: 2/23/2005

Types: News, Science & technology

If you thought The X-Files was strange, try real life. My mother always said that truth is stranger than fiction, but I still had to do a double-take at this Washington Post headline: “U.S. Denies Patent for a Too-Human Hybrid.” Seems a New York professor tried to get a patent on a yet-to-be-creat...[MORE]

Off the deep end: Dr. Heimlich’s dangerous maneuvers

By Curt Guyette

Published: 12/8/2004

Types: News, Science & technology

Derrick Kelly lay unconscious on the deck of Eastern Michigan University’s Jones Pool, bloody foam oozing from his mouth and nose. At that moment on the night of Jan. 31, 2003, decades’ worth of effort on the part of Dr. Henry J. Heimlich came into play when the maneuver bearing his name was pe...[MORE]

All mucked up: Questions abound in proposal to turn Detroit sewage into fertilizer.

By Curt Guyette

Published: 2/25/2004

Types: News, Science & technology

For the past few months, Lisa Goldstein has been studying a proposal to turn human waste into fertilizer. As director of the nonprofit Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision, Goldstein is trying to weigh the pros and cons of a plan that could have a significant impact on her community. Is it be...[MORE]

The power that wasn’t there

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 8/20/2003

Types: News, Science & technology

We’re a superpower with a Third World [electricity] grid. —Bill Richardson, former U.S. energy secretary, Aug. 15, 2003   Here’s a snapshot of the state of early 21st century technology: We can aim a missile at a specific building thousands of miles away and actually hit it. We can send...[MORE]

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