It seems you're using an old browser. In order to view this site correctly, we advise you to upgrade your browser, or try the free Mozilla Firefox.

Browse News & Feature Stories

Keyword search

World Stories

56 stories found. Showing page 1 of 2.

Bigger than the Silverdome: Wonder Twins take on composer A.R. Rahman, again ...

By D'Anne & Laura Witkowski

Published: 9/29/2010

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Back in June, the Wonder Twins set off on a journey to the Pontiac Silverdome to see Indian composer and musician A.R. Rahman's Journey Home World Tour. As they drove up that fateful day, police turned them and countless others away. Apparently a massive stage collapse had forced the cancellation of...[MORE]

Sean Blackman's world music: Five years and thousands of air miles lead to Orchestra Hall

By Pietro Truba

Published: 9/22/2010

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Rain is pounding the roof of Sean Blackman's Clawson bungalow. He and his main collaborator Pathe Jassi are in an open attic room; tapestries decorate the walls, a sword sits by the stairway, and instruments from around the world are strewn across the floor. Jassi hands Blackman back his nylon-strin...[MORE]

Blooming talent: Motor City years were formative for Syrian-American singer Gaida

By Simone Landon

Published: 8/11/2010

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

A gaida is a bagpipe-type instrument used in North African and Balkan music. It produces a lilting, reverberating sound, not unlike Syrian-American singer Gaida's voice, but she laughs at this association. Her name should be spelled Ghaida, but Americans can't pronounce the Arabic ghrayn, which is t...[MORE]

Top Rahman: Two hundred million record buyers can't be wrong

By Meghana Keshavan

Published: 6/16/2010

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Indian cinema has long been known for punctuating melodrama with incongruous, showstopping song-and-dance numbers, which had elicited a collective chortle in the West — until, of course, 2008's Slumdog Millionaire. The poignant Oscar-winner inspired movie masses to look east for a new sound, a...[MORE]

Squeezeboxin': Due to a long history and love affair with the instrument, the Motor City might really be the eye of the accordion storm

By Amy Elliott

Published: 3/17/2010

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

In a quiet office plaza off the I-696 corridor in Warren, John Castiglione sells accordions. The showroom's small and sort of corporate; there are no flashy displays, diamond-encrusted instruments or autographed posters for show, no polka music piped through the speakers. There aren't even that many...[MORE]

Seasonal celebration

By News Hits staff

Published: 12/9/2009

Types: News, World

The holiday season brings parties, religious observances and shopping frenzies, but one annual event combines all three traditions with a more sobering cause. Thursday marks the 61st anniversary of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, a cause being pursued in many parts of the world. The...[MORE]

Defend real Americans: Anyone who seeks safety and freedom in America is one of us

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 9/2/2009

Types: News, World

They come from the hellholes of the earth, from the torture cells of the former Yugoslavia, the military prisons of South America and the killing fields of sub-Saharan Africa. Usually tortured, with family members murdered, they show up on the doorstep of the century-old former convent they call Fre...[MORE]

Ye olde twins of wonder: The Twinsies get all medieval on yer asses ...

By D'Anne, Laura Witkowski

Published: 8/26/2009

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Summer's coming to an end — and you know what that means: It's time to don some chain mail and a leather corset and party like it's 1599 at the Michigan Renaissance Festival in Holly (weekends and Labor Day through Oct. 3-4, michrenfest.com). The Wonder Twins walked into the woods as jaded wom...[MORE]

Rhythm corps: The sounds that changed the beat of America

By W. Kim Heron

Published: 7/29/2009

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Olatunji! Drums of Passion Columbia Legacy Tito Puente Dance Mania  RCA Legacy Revisionism alert: The propulsive 2 and 4 of rock 'n' roll-rhythm and blues wasn't the only big beat shaking America from the doldrums of the late 1950s, and these recent reissues are the forceful reminder.  For Ex...[MORE]

World beaters: 20 years of musical invaders

By W. Kim Heron

Published: 7/15/2009

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

Ali Farka Touré was part of a guerrilla army of artists waiting to invade the States and Europe in the 1980s. All they needed was an opening. And when the ethnomusicologists' term "world music" was appropriated by the music marketers and promoters, the Malian guitarist and his cohor...[MORE]

Dub, mon!: He's a piece of many rock 'n' roll bands, but Eric 'Beats' Hoegemeyer's digging his Deep See Sound System

By Brett Callwood

Published: 1/28/2009

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

For a man with such a big reputation, Eric Hoegemeyer's as humble a local musician as you could ever hope to meet. He's a man of many faces. For some, he'll forever be remembered as the animated drummer with the Brit-pop-y Charm Farm. Others might know him as the floppy-haired singer fronting ...[MORE]

People who died: Some deaths deserve a little extra note

By Anna Ditkoff, Edward Ericson Jr. & Lee Gardner

Published: 12/24/2008

Types: News, World

Death took its usual toll this year, and seemingly then some. Genocide, war, terrorist attacks, disease — yikes. But for the purposes of this tribute to influential cultural notables whose deaths deserve a little extra note, it was a terrible harvest. In addition to the loss of A-list names li...[MORE]

Ritter here

By News Hits staff

Published: 1/23/2008

Types: News, World

When we last talked with Middle East arms expert Scott Ritter, he was preparing for a fact-finding trip to Iran ("Bombs away," Metro Times, Nov. 28, 2007) in an attempt to help stave off what he predicts is a likely U.S. military attack on that country. As it turns out, difficulty obtaining the...[MORE]

New World disorder: Clash in suites, not streets, killed WTO talks.

By Monte Paulsen

Published: 12/8/1999

Types: News, World

SEATTLE — Demonstrators danced in the soggy streets of Seattle on Sunday, celebrating after a week of mostly peaceful protests hobbled the World Trade Organization's ministerial meeting. But the Battle of Seattle that drew 40,000 activists paled in co...[MORE]

An opposition unites: Elevating world trade to a public debate.

By David Bacon

Published: 12/8/1999

Types: News, World

SEATTLE — Those who marched or stood or sat in the streets of this city last week made history, and they knew it. And like the great marches against the Vietnam War, or the first sit-ins in the South during the late '50s, it was not always ...[MORE]

We all need Amnesty

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 12/1/1999

Types: News, World

Mordechai Vanunu is a hero to some, a traitor to others, but to Detroit's small but dedicated Amnesty International chapter, he is just a man who has been in prison for 13 years, most of it in solitary, and who now, his ...[MORE]

Showdown in Seattle: The World Trade Organization could spark the Super Bowl of protests

By Jason Gay

Published: 11/24/1999

Types: News, World

When President Clinton and bigwigs from more than 100 nations hit Seattle in late November to discuss the global economy at the World Trade Organization's annual summit, they'll be greeted by more than spiffy fruit baskets in their hotel suites. ...[MORE]

Surgery a success

By Jennifer Bagwell

Published: 10/27/1999

Types: News, World

A 12-year-old Iraqi girl brought to the United States by a Southfield-based relief agency has undergone successful open-heart surgery and is expected to return home within three weeks. Zahraa Hamada’s surgery was performed Oct. 18 at no cost to...[MORE]

You're getting warmer: The Kyoto accord was struck a decade ago. Why so little progress?

By Bill McKibben

Published: 12/5/2007

Types: News, World

I remember so well the final morning hours of the Kyoto conference. The negotiations had gone on long past their scheduled evening close, and the convention-center management was frantic — a trade show for children's clothing was about to begin, and every corner of the vast hall still was litt...[MORE]

Aid from the enemy

By Jennifer Bagwell

Published: 10/13/1999

Types: News, World

To say that Zahraa Hamada has just made an ironic journey would be the understatement of her lifetime. The 12-year-old Iraqi girl flew thousands of miles last week to receive open-heart surgery in a country that is bombing her homeland, killing an...[MORE]

Mariela and the dictator

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 10/13/1999

Types: News, World

"Today, justice was done," Gonzalo Martinez, Mexico’s former ambassador to Chile, proclaimed last week, when a British court ruled the former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet could be sent to Spain for trial on human r...[MORE]

Letters from jail: The lives of an anti-apartheid activist and his editor intersect in a new book.

By W. Kim Heron

Published: 9/29/1999

Types: News, World

"It was all quite amusing," wrote the South African inmate of a gathering some 17 years earlier. "Do you still remember? It was New Year’s Eve, wasn’t it? Little did we know then what 1963 would bring. The watershed that changed ...[MORE]

Wake me when it starts

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 7/7/1999

Types: News, World

Well, I know you are still winding down from the Fourth of July celebrations of our victory in Kosovo. Marie Donigan, a city councilmember in Royal Oak, reports she is leading her town’s efforts to erect its own Yugoslav victory ...[MORE]

From here to Australia

By Peter Werbe

Published: 6/16/1999

Types: News, World

When local peace and social justice activists assemble this Friday at Hart Plaza to protest the G8 summit meeting of leaders from the world’s wealthiest nations, they will be part of an effort stretching across 40 countries. Groups ranging from Indian farmers to Australian tra...[MORE]

Wim and vigor: An interview with Wim Wenders.

By Serena Donadoni

Published: 6/16/1999

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

"When you see them, you realize that you cannot even make any separation between their lives and music," German director Wim Wenders says of the Cuban musicians in his documentary, Buena Vista Social Club. "It’s just all one and the s...[MORE]

Bollywood nights: A generation of South Asians melds a new cultural mix

By Meghana Keshavan

Published: 8/22/2007

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

No vivid splashes of pink. No monsoon-drenched damsels. No lab coats, no spicy curry, no "Thank you, come again!" It's a crowd of popped collars and kohl-rimmed eyes tonight, of diamond nose studs and hair gel en masse. Timid onlookers smoke cigarettes and drink in the scene; a few couples gr...[MORE]

Bring back the USSR!

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 5/26/1999

Types: News, World

When we were young, we all knew the USSR was the main source of everything bad. That’s right. The Soviet Union. The mother lode of godless communism. They were, we were told, scheming to bury us. For my generation there ...[MORE]

The beat goes on: Son of a legendary African drummer pays tribute at his father’s favorite festival

By Khary Kimani Turner

Published: 8/15/2007

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

King Sundiata Keita, the beloved forerunner of Detroit's African drum and dance community, must have decided to leave some of his spirit behind when he passed away two years ago. The reasoning behind this theory is that his son, Prince Sewande Keita, has emerged as a wicked percussionist on hi...[MORE]

Untimely thoughts: An armed society is a polite society.

By Jack Lessenberry

Published: 5/5/1999

Types: News, World

With great sorrow and disbelief I must report that my rather mild column last week ("Death to the NRA") did not meet with universal approval. This was deeply distressing to me, as a white, middle-aged liberal. As you...[MORE]

Paint by colors

By W. Kim Heron, Brian Smith

Published: 7/18/2007

Types: Music, Ethnic/World

"As a child, I used to think Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, Nat 'King' Cole, Johnny Hodges, Frank Sinatra were living inside that gramophone," Hugh Masekela wrote in an essay on his life in music. "My uncle would wind it up and play it to me, and I used to say 'hello' to them all." And as a 13-y...[MORE]

> PLACE CLASSIFIED AD