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Media > Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Detroit studies, populism and more

 

Published 9/1/2010

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Get schooled

Thanks for your coverage of the University of Michigan's Semester in Detroit program ("A season in Detroit," Aug. 25). Simone Landon's smart piece was timely, as we are now recruiting both undergraduate students and Detroit nonprofits for Winter 2011. (See semesterindetroit.com.)

My only quibble is that the article inadvertently slights other great U-M initiatives happening in partnership with various Detroit organizations and people — some of which have been happening for many years, even decades. Students, staff and faculty from U-M schools and colleges — including public health, engineering, law, social work, urban planning, art and design, and more — are doing research, service and community engagement reciprocally and respectfully in partnership with many Detroit-based organizations and neighborhoods. Metro Times readers are invited to see for themselves with a visit to the U-M Detroit Center at Woodward and Mack Avenue — now in its sixth year at that site.

I hope MT will continue to cover these important university-community collaborations as they are an important and growing factor shaping Detroit's and the greater region's future. —Craig Regester, Detroit, associate director, U-M Semester in Detroit


People power

Re: Bernero vs. Snyder (Aug. 11), based on recent polls, it is clear to me a large majority of Michiganders doesn't understand that our current economic woes have been decades in the making. Starting with Reaganomics in the 1980s — followed by horrible trade agreements made in the 1990s — our state has been ravaged by policies that have literally destroyed the middle class and concentrated the nation's wealth to an elite few. 

That said, I cannot understand why anyone would even think of putting a wealthy Wall Street type with no experience in governing in the Big Chair in Lansing. Although no one we choose will be the magic cure for Michigan's economic ills, I believe a populist and common sense approach to rebuilding this state is what we need now. —Mark Barringer, Farmington Hills


Love light is on

Re: Travis Wright's article about disc jockey Jon Moshier and the role that 1980s disc jockey the Electrifying Mojo played in his life ("What's the frequency?" Aug. 18), when I saw the cover of that edition, I was, at first aghast that the title "The Electrifying Moshier!" had been used. "How dare someone," I thought, "adapt the moniker to describe someone other than the one and only Mojo." Upon turning to the article, my attitude softened as I realized the homage being paid by the contemporary Moshier to his "mentor." I am now 49 years old. But from my mid-teens to mid-20s, I lived for the Electrifying Mojo's radio program. Wright did a great job exploring Mojo's influence on Moshier; and Moshier's recollections brought me back to 11 p.m. on Friday nights, listening to Mojo tell us to flash our porch lights as we waited in anticipation of the incredible mix of tunes. The highlight of my life was to actually call the radio station one late night and actually speak to the Mojo. Thanks to Jon Moshier for giving the Mojo the credit he is due. Next stop is the mothership. Get ready to ride. —Claudia Tusset, Mount Clemens 


Dear John

I just wanted to send a quick expression of admiration for the articles by Detroitblogger John. As a 25-year-old lifelong Detroiter (not metro Detroiter), I appreciate his eagerness to explore the quirks of Detroit life that may not be flashy enough for the front page but are interesting enough to encourage readers to explore it for themselves. Our citizens have so much character, and it is truly refreshing to see someone take notice of the people that make up the place. —Marcia Venson, Detroit

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